Allied Health Profession

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Allied Health Professions (AHPs) make up the third-largest workforce of the National Health Services. They are primarily degree-level professionals who work independently in their fields. The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) regulates 13 of the 14 AHPs, while the General Osteopathic Council regulates osteopaths (GOC). AHPs work across the social care, housing, education, and independent and voluntary sectors to assess, treat, diagnose, and discharge patients. AHPs can help manage patients' care throughout their lives, from birth to palliative care, using a holistic healthcare approach. Their focus is on health and well-being prevention and improvement in order to maximise people's capacity to live full and active lives in their families, social networks, education/training, and workplaces.

There are 14 professions under AHP

​Art therapists

Art therapists utilise art as a kind of psychotherapy to help clients to address a wide range of challenges, such as emotional, behavioural, or mental health issues, learning or physical disabilities, life-limiting illnesses, neurological conditions, or physical ailments. People of all ages, from youngsters to the elderly, use art therapy in this way to support them with their specific difficulties, regardless of artistic experience. It is a medium of communication and expression rather than a diagnostic technique.​

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Dramatherapists

Dramatherapists are clinicians and artists who use their understanding of theatre/drama and therapy to use the performing arts as a therapeutic tool. Clients can examine a wide range of difficulties and requirements, including autism and dementia, as well as physical/sexual abuse and mental illness, leading to psychological, emotional, and social transformations. Dramatherapists work in a variety of contexts, including schools, mental health facilities, general health and social care facilities, jails, and the voluntary sector.

Music Therapists

Music therapists engage clients in live musical interaction to improve an individual's emotional well-being and communication abilities. 
Clients do not require any prior musical instrument (or even singing) expertise because this well-established psychological therapy intervention uses their unique connection to music and the relationship, they've built with their therapist to help them: 

  • Develop and promote communication skills.

  • Increase your self-assurance and independence.

  • Improve your self-awareness as well as your awareness of others.

  • Improve your ability to concentrate and pay attention. Clients who cannot communicate due to disability, illness, or injury benefit from music therapy because their psychological, emotional, cognitive, physical, communicative, and social needs can be met through musical contact with their therapist. On the other hand, music therapy can benefit people of all ages and capacities, from newborn babies who need to build a parent-child attachment to those undergoing palliative or end-of-life care.

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Chiropodists/ Podiatrists
 

Podiatrists provide vital assessment, evaluation, and foot care to a wide range of patients with a variety of long-term and acute disorders. 
Many of these people are in high-risk groups, such as diabetics, cerebral palsy patients, peripheral arterial disease patients, and peripheral nerve injury patients, for whom podiatric care is critical. Many podiatrists have advanced their education by specialising in biomechanics or surgery. 
Biomechanics is frequently connected with the treatment of sports-related injuries, but it also applies to youngsters and the elderly. Surgical procedures in all facets of foot health management are available from podiatrists. 
Podiatrists operate in both community and acute care settings, and while many are NHS staff, many podiatrists now work in the commercial sector as well.

Dietitians

Dietitians are the only trained health professionals who can examine, diagnose, and treat dietary and nutritional disorders in individuals and the general public.
Dietitians are the only professionals who use the most up-to-date public health and scientific research on food, health, and illness to provide practical advice to help individuals make healthy lifestyles and eating choices. Dietitians are the only nutrition experts bound by law and an ethical code to ensure that they always perform at the highest level. Dietitians work in various settings, including the NHS, private practice, industry, education, research, sport, the media, public relations, publishing, government, and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). 
Dietitians provide advice and influence on food and health policies at all levels, from the federal government to local communities and individuals.

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Occupational Therapists

Occupational therapists (OTs) operate in a variety of settings, including the NHS, local government social services, housing, schools, prisons, the voluntary and independent sectors, vocational and employment rehabilitation programmes, as well as education and research. 
Occupational therapists help people of all ages who are dealing with a variety of issues caused by physical, mental, social, or developmental issues.
Occupational therapists provide a variety of therapies to help people return to or improve their participation in many aspects of their lives, such as caring for themselves and others, working, learning, playing, and engaging with others. Because being denied or having limited access to any or all of these occupations can negatively impact physical and mental health, occupational therapists (OTs) have a positive impact on patient well-being and rehabilitation in most care pathways and the broader public health and social care environment.

Operating Department Practitioners

Operating Department Practitioners (ODPs) are highly trained healthcare professionals that assist patients of all ages during their perioperative care:

  • Anaesthetic - provide patient-centred care and prepare specialised equipment and medications as an anaesthesiologist.

  • Surgical - prepare all essential surgical equipment and instruments and make them available to the surgical team during the procedure.

  • Recovery - assisting the patient during their stay in the recovery ward, including monitoring vital signs and determining their readiness to return to the ward. In addition to providing specialised care, ODPs are in charge of preparing the operating room and ensuring communication between the surgical team, the operating room, and the rest of the hospital. ODPs are most commonly found in operating rooms, but their talents are increasingly in demand in other hospital critical care areas.

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Orthoptists

The orthoptic clinical practice is broad and includes both diagnosis and treatment. Premature newborns with retinopathy of prematurity, youngsters with impaired vision owing to squinting, and adults and children with eye movement disorders caused by diabetes, hypertension, endocrine dysfunction, cancer, trauma, and stroke are treated by orthoptists. Glaucoma, cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration are among the high-volume ophthalmic specialities where extended scope orthoptic practitioners now work.
Orthoptists work in health and education in acute hospital and community settings, frequently as part of a multidisciplinary medical, nursing, and AHP team.

Orthoptists

The orthoptic clinical practice is broad and includes both diagnosis and treatment. Premature newborns with retinopathy of prematurity, youngsters with impaired vision owing to squinting, and adults and children with eye movement disorders caused by diabetes, hypertension, endocrine dysfunction, cancer, trauma, and stroke are treated by orthoptists. Glaucoma, cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration are among the high-volume ophthalmic specialities where extended scope orthoptic practitioners now work.
Orthoptists work in health and education in acute hospital and community settings, frequently as part of a multidisciplinary medical, nursing, and AHP team.

Osteopaths

Osteopaths diagnose and treat a wide range of medical issues by using a comprehensive approach to the structure and function of the body. 
Their research is based on the idea that an individual's skeleton, muscles, ligaments, and connective tissues must cooperate to preserve health.
Osteopaths restore biological equilibrium by increasing joint mobility, reducing muscular tension, improving blood and nerve supply to tissues, and stimulating an individual's healing mechanisms using a variety of non-invasive treatments such as touch, manual manipulation, stretching, and massage.

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Prosthetists and Orthotists

Prosthetists are self-employed registered practitioners who help patients with limb loss with gait analysis and technical solutions. 
They are well-versed in mechanics, biomechanics, material science, anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology at the undergraduate level. 
Their credentials qualify them to design and fabricate prostheses that mimic the structural and functional characteristics of the patient's missing limb. Patients with congenital loss and loss caused by diabetes, poor vascularity, infection, and trauma are treated by them. 
Autonomous practitioners usually collaborate closely with physiotherapists and occupational therapists as part of multidisciplinary amputee rehabilitation teams.

Orthotists are self-employed certified practitioners that analyse gait and design treatments for patients with neuromuscular, muscular, and skeletal system issues. They are well-versed in mechanics, biomechanics, material science, anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology at the undergraduate level. Their credentials qualify them to develop and offer orthoses that alter the structural or functional aspects of a patient's neuromuscular and skeletal systems, allowing them to move around, eliminate gait deviations, reduce falls, reduce pain, and prevent and aid ulcer healing. Diabetes, arthritis, cerebral palsy, stroke, spina bifida, scoliosis, musculoskeletal, physiotherapy, sports injuries, and trauma are among the illnesses they treat. While they frequently work independently, they are often members of multidisciplinary teams within the diabetic foot or neuro-rehabilitation team.
 

Paramedics

In an accident or a medical emergency, paramedics are the senior ambulance service and healthcare workers. 
They deliver oxygen and medications while using high-tech equipment like defibrillators, spinal and traction splints, and intravenous infusions. 
Paramedics are often on their own and are responsible for assessing the patient's health and administering life-saving treatment.

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Physiotherapists

Physiotherapy employs physical ways to promote, preserve, and repair physical, psychological, and social well-being, collaborating with individuals to maximise their functional capacity and potential through cooperation and negotiation. Physiotherapists use advice, treatment, rehabilitation, health promotion, and behavioural change to address impairment problems, activity, and participation and manage recovering, stable, and deteriorating conditions – particularly those involving the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. In response to individual needs, physiotherapy employs manual treatment, therapeutic exercise, electro-physical modalities, and other physical techniques. Physiotherapists work with a wide range of population and patient groups, including children, working people, and the elderly, in a variety of sectors and locations, including acute, community, and workplace settings.

Speech and Language Therapists

In the United Kingdom, speech and language therapists (SLTs) help children and adults overcome or adapt to a wide range of speech, language, communication, and swallowing impairments. These include assisting young children in gaining access to education, assisting young offenders in achieving access to programmes designed to reduce reoffending, reducing life-threatening swallowing problems in the early days after a stroke, and providing essential support to adults with a variety of acquired neurological communication difficulties in resuming work and their roles in their families and communities.

Speech and Language Therapists

In the United Kingdom, speech and language therapists (SLTs) help children and adults overcome or adapt to a wide range of speech, language, communication, and swallowing impairments. These include assisting young children in gaining access to education, assisting young offenders in achieving access to programmes designed to reduce reoffending, reducing life-threatening swallowing problems in the early days after a stroke, and providing essential support to adults with a variety of acquired neurological communication difficulties in resuming work and their roles in their families and communities.

Speech and Language Therapists

In the United Kingdom, speech and language therapists (SLTs) help children and adults overcome or adapt to a wide range of speech, language, communication, and swallowing impairments. These include assisting young children in gaining access to education, assisting young offenders in achieving access to programmes designed to reduce reoffending, reducing life-threatening swallowing problems in the early days after a stroke, and providing essential support to adults with a variety of acquired neurological communication difficulties in resuming work and their roles in their families and communities.

Speech and Language Therapists

In the United Kingdom, speech and language therapists (SLTs) help children and adults overcome or adapt to a wide range of speech, language, communication, and swallowing impairments. These include assisting young children in gaining access to education, assisting young offenders in achieving access to programmes designed to reduce reoffending, reducing life-threatening swallowing problems in the early days after a stroke, and providing essential support to adults with a variety of acquired neurological communication difficulties in resuming work and their roles in their families and communities.

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Radiographers

Diagnostic radiographers: Most treatment plans include diagnostic imaging. To detect an injury or disease, diagnostic radiographers employ a variety of procedures to obtain high-quality images. They are in charge of performing safe and accurate imaging examinations, as well as the report that follows. Radiographers are also important parts of the Breast Screening and Pregnancy Ultrasound Monitoring teams.

Therapeutic Radiographers: Therapeutic radiographers are essential in the treatment of cancer. They are also accountable because they are the only health care providers qualified to plan and deliver radiation. 
Radiotherapy can be used alone or in conjunction with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Therapeutic radiographers oversee the patient's progress through the various stages of radiation, giving care and support to patients during their treatment.